The Memphis News - Digital Edition

10032014-Vol7-No41-UF

Issue link: http://memphisnews.uberflip.com/i/391894

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 22 of 39

October 3-9, 2014 23 w w w.t hememphisnews.com A few weeks ago, I had the honor of sitting on a career panel about making the right career moves. In a packed room, we cov- ered every- thing from preparing for a job interview to how offi ce politics can infl uence promotions at work. Just as the panel was about to wrap up, a young man stood up in the back of the room with a question. He asked, "If you could speak to your younger self, what advice would you give considering what you know now?" His question was very insightful and has continued to come up numerous times since then, so I wanted to share my thoughts on this topic with you. Although it may not seem this way now, my undergraduate degree is in computer and systems engineering. That's right. For four years during college, I wrote code, soldered hardware compo- nents, and even redesigned car parts for General Motors. The college I went to was fi lled with super-smart whiz kids who all seemed to have perfect (no kidding) scores on their SATs. All of our coursework was math, science or computer programming. Time and time again, I would be paired up with three other students to complete a programming project. It never failed that they were all brilliant. Among the group, I was almost always the least good computer programmer, and let me tell you, that was not a great feeling. Looking for other opportunities to contribute to our class projects, I would ensure that our report was well-written. I'd make our presentation look great. I'd setup a backboard and sometimes develop a brochure. I became the project manager and marketing coordinator. Keep in mind that I did all these things because I felt like the lowest man on the computer programming totem pole. Our senior year, we were each asked to write an essay about someone who made a diff erence for us in school. Like many students, I wrote about a professor who had infl uenced my life. One of the brilliant classmates I'd be working with wrote about me. I couldn't believe it. He wrote about how great I was at organizing the group. He wrote about my leadership skills. And, he wrote about my creativity and my project management skills. He talked about how I brought something to the table nobody else had, and how it made all our work better. Who knew that all those things I'd been doing to make up for something else were actually a strength! The advice I'd give my younger self and to you is this: Focus on your strengths. Don't beat yourself up too much over the things you struggle with. There are things that you do better than anything else. Focus on those things. Work to be the best at them. And, if you need to, fi nd someone to help you with the areas that you're not as strong in. honor of sitting on a career panel about making the right career moves. In a packed room, we cov- ered every- thing from preparing for a job interview to how offi ce politics can infl uence promotions at work. up, a young man stood up in the back of the room with a question. He asked, "If you could speak to your younger self, what advice would you give considering what you know now?" has continued to come up numerous times since then, so I wanted to share my thoughts on this topic with you. now, my undergraduate degree is in computer and systems engineering. That's right. For four years during college, nents, and even redesigned car parts for General Motors. super-smart whiz kids who all seemed to have perfect (no kidding) scores on their SATs. All of our coursework was math, science or computer programming. paired up with three other students to complete a programming project. It never failed that they were all brilliant. Among the group, I was almost always the least good computer programmer, and let me tell you, that was not a great feeling. contribute to our class projects, I would ensure that our report was well-written. develop a brochure. I became the project manager and marketing coordinator. because I felt like the lowest man on the computer programming totem pole. to write an essay about someone who made a diff erence for us in school. Like many students, I wrote about a professor who had infl uenced my life. working with wrote about me. I couldn't believe it. He wrote about how great I was at organizing the group. He wrote about my leadership skills. And, he wrote about my creativity and my project management skills. He talked about how else had, and how it made all our work better. been doing to make up for something else were actually a strength! self and to you is this: Focus on your strengths. Don't beat yourself up too much over the things you struggle with. There are things that you do better than anything else. Focus on those things. Work to be the best at them. And, if you need to, fi nd someone to help you with the areas that you're not as strong in. Focus On Your Strengths Kate Simone ksimone@memphisdailynews.com hometown: Memphis experience: Bachelor of arts in Russian and linguistics, Bryn Mawr College; gradu- ate work at the Universite of Strasbourg, France. Experi- enced editor, translator and interpreter; previously worked for the Institut Gustave Roussy and the Assemblee Nationale in Paris. President of the Stuttering Foundation since 1981, co-author of "If your Child Stutters: A Guide for Parents," and editor or co- editor of numerous Stuttering Foundation publications. Family: Husband, who is an attorney, and two children Favorite quote: "Lose is not in my vocabulary." Favorite movie: "The King's Speech" what's playing on your ste- reo right now? Fleetwood Mac or Eric Clapton Activities you enjoy outside of work: Swimming what talent do you wish you had? This one is tough. … Not sure. who has had the greatest influence on you and why? My father, because his goal was to help others succeed in their lives. what is the purpose of the stuttering Foundation? To make a diff erence in the lives of those who stutter. what advancements have been made in stutter- ing since the foundation started? We know a lot more about early intervention and prevention. what do you consider your greatest accomplishment? Our recent DVD productions on prevention of stuttering. what do you most enjoy about your work? Meet- ing people and helping them solve problems. if you could give one piece of advice to young people, what would it be? you learn from any and every job you do, however menial it may seem at the time. Diane Tabulog has been pro- moted to director of technical recruiting at Vaco Memphis. Tabulog has been part of Va- co's technology division for eight years and has risen to be one of the top IT recruiters in the company. Prior to be- coming a recruiter, she was a consultant for Vaco and has a background in database development and business analysis. Danny McKee has joined A2H as senior associate prin- cipal. McKee will help lead the fi rm's business-develop- ment efforts among public and private clients across Memphis and the Mid-South. He brings more than 25 years of experience in the local architectural/engineering industry, specifi cally with health care and industrial projects. Brandon D. Pettes, an at- torney with Glankler Brown PLLC, has been named a member of the Leo Bearman Sr. American Inn of Court. The American Inns of Court are design as a tutorial or- ganization with the goal of improving the skills, profes- sionalism and legal ethics of the bench and bar. Pettes concentrates his practice in business and commercial liti- gation. Myron Mays has been pro- moted to vice president of the Black Business Associa- Stuttering Foundation's Fraser Honored FraSEr TaBULOG AngeLA coPeLAnD CAREER CORNER n E W S m A K E R S JANE FRASER, president of the Memphis-based Stuttering Foundation of America, has received an honorary fellowship from the London-based Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists. She was selected for her distinguished service in promoting the profession of speech and language therapy. Fraser, whose father started the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation in 1947, has served as its president since 1981. NeWsMAKeRs continued on P31 PETTES Collierville 3607 S. Houston Levee Rd. 901-853-5100 Memphis 5384 Poplar Ave. 901-249-2000 www.first-state.net With Free online banking, Free mobile banking, Free app for iPad,and even Free mobilecheck deposit, your life never misses a beat. Discover the incredible convenience of banking with First State Bank. It's our way of helping you meet life head on!

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

view archives of The Memphis News - Digital Edition - 10032014-Vol7-No41-UF